RPG tool: Random relationship map for citizens of a town

I’m on a roll. Decided to add yet another tool to the Amar Role-Playing Game. You now get a randomly generated relationship map between the citizens whenever you generate a fantasy village, town or city.

You can also download your generated village/town/city as a text file, edit it as you wish and upload your edited file to get a random relationship map for your new settlement. Check out the tools here: Tools for the Amar RPG.

You will get a map like this:

Click the image to zoom in.

Be aware, for larger settlements, the map becomes chaotic.

Source code for all the Amar RPG tools is freely avalable on Github.

RPG Random Town Generator

The Amar Role-Playing Game has got yet another tool: a random town generator. It doesn’t draw a map for you, but it will save contless hours populating villages, towns and cities. You will get a realistic distribution of house types, shops and trades. Each house is populated with residents – complete with name, age, sex, main skill level and basic personality.

Whereas this tool is created for the Amar RPG, it will save time for Game Masters of any fantasy RPG in creating settlements for a game campaign.

Source code for all the Amar RPG tools is avalable on Github.

Amar RPG: New tools

The Amar Role-Playing Game has got two new tools lately.

To understand what Amar RPG is, check out its extensive wiki.

The new tools are a random names generator and an “Open ended dice roller“. The random names generator will give you ten names of the race you pick (from human male and female names to dwarves, elves, trolls and more).

If you are a Game Master for an Amar RPG campaign, you now have a better swiss army knife at your disposal.

Coming up is something even more time-saving. I won’t reveal just yet what it is, but I can tell you that it will save hours upon hours of preparations – even if you are playing other Role-Playing Game systems.

The AMAR app for Android

It was time for me to create an app. With an autobiography published in 2013, a bunch of OnePageBooks on Amazon, artwork on 500px, music on Spotify, just short of 50 projects on GitHub – the next natural check-off on my bucket list was an app. OK, a simple Android app viewing the AMAR NPCg site as a tool for Game Masters of the AMAR Role-Playing Game. But an app nontheless. As usual with stuff I create, it’s free. Get it on Google Play:

http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.isene.amarnpcg

Feel free to test it and give it 5 stars 🙂

Why Dungeons & Dragons and Pathfinder suck

If you haven’t played Role-Playing games, and D&D/Pathfinder in particular, just skip this post. If you have, then you may appreciate my rant.

I have been playing RPGs since 1981 and designing RPGs since 1983. I have tested, played and researched in detail scores of RPGs, and I’ve found many good systems and many well crafted settings. Dungeons & Dragons and Pathfinder are among the worst RPG systems made. Here’s but a few of the terrible design “features”:

  1. Classes: Enforcing stereotypes is a desgn flaw of any system. It brings with it unnatural restrictions that are hard to explain… “No, you can’t pick up that sword, you’re a Magic User!”
  2. Hit Points increase with level: A medium level fighter can take ten times the damage of an average man in the street. And it takes 10 Cure Light Wounds to get him from fainted to full HP as opposed to one CLW for the average man. You can’t kill an experienced adventurer with an arrow, etc.
  3. Armor Class: In D&D/Pathfinder, waring armor makes it harder to hit you, but the damage done from a weapon is just the same. In reality, armor never makes it harder to hit anyone, it subtracts from damage done.
  4. D20: Using a 20-sided dice with smaller adjustments makes the spread too wide. You’re a dancer with a +7 modifier on the dice roll. One day you throw a 2 on the dice and your dancing is below average.. The next day you throw 19 and your performance is beyond what any everage person can do.
  5. Complexity: With silly basic design flaws like the above, trying to make the system somewhat realistic is a very complicated task. It makes for a complex system with lots of special rules. If the basic design was more realistic, the complete system would be much simpler. Simpler systems make it easer for new players to join in and for new Game Masters to get up and running. Having the GM sift through pages upon pages of complex rules mid-game while players start fiddling with their phones sorta kills the fun. Simpler, more realistic systems let the actual role-playing shine and the playing sessions run more smoothly with less awkward rules getting in the way. The rules should help the game play, not distract from it with surprising unrealism.

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